Kōtuitui

Woodlands Park

Liz Manley

Liz Manley, Principal

Woodlands Park School is a special place. Started in 1958, it is situated in a beautiful, bush-clad valley adjacent to Scenic Drive in the Waitakere Ranges of West Auckland. We work hard to ensure that children have a strong sense of belonging, they feel safe and respected and they love to be here. Woodlands Park School tamariki have a confident voice in their school. We pride ourselves on being a small school with a big heart. The way in which we uphold each person as an individual, but work together genuinely as a team, is important to parents, children and staff and draws attention from many visitors to the school. The size of our school means that we know all our children well, we uphold their unique strengths and we work in genuine partnership with whanau. Our commitment to creating an inclusive environment for all children is an integral part of who we are. Positive and supportive relationships among teachers and students are based on mutual respect. It is important to our community that our tamariki are inspired to be the innovators of tomorrow. Part of our vision is to be recognised as a centre for excellence in education and we are well on the way to being just that. We have achieved a four to five year review status from ERO since this was introduced and stand proudly as one of the founding Green Gold Enviroschools, with a proud tradition of sustainability. Our school acts as a tuakana (mentor) to other schools, supporting them on their own Enviroschools journeys and our children contribute to many community sustainability initiatives.
Woodlands Park School is excited to be a part of the research and development currently underway through Kōtuitui. This collaborative work is already building a deeper understanding of our shared context and strengthening transitions and pathways for individual children along their educational journey.

This is my Woodlands Park in-school Community of Learning team:

Marijke Hansford

Marijke Hansford

My inquiry is: How can we create a fully inclusive classroom environment where all children, including those with additional needs, can thrive? Key questions are: What do we believe inclusion is? How do we demonstrate it already? What could we do to improve inclusion at our school? A quote I really like is: “Inclusion is a mindset. It is a way of thinking. It’s not a program that we run or a classroom in our school or a favour we do for someone. Inclusion is who we are. It is who we must strive to be” - Lisa Friedman: Removing the Stumbling Block.

Nick Gill

Nick Gill

My inquiry focus for 2018 has shifted from boys learning writing to a broader focus on learning; more specifically, do our children see themselves as successful and empowered learners? As part of my 2017 inquiry on boys and writing our students were surveyed on their own thoughts about writing and learning writing. Staff found the results of the survey extremely valuable and there was strong desire to see this kind of student voice across other learning areas. In response to this, my inquiry this year will start with gathering data about our students’ perception of themselves as learners.